RBC Void Cheque: How to Get RBC Void Cheque

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Protecting your banking information is necessary so that it doesn’t fall into the wrong hands. One way of protecting this information is through void cheques. 

RBC Bank offers its customers the ability to protect their banking information through void cheques. 

Void cheques are similar to standard cheques but they provide a more secure method of transmitting account information to other parties.

Understanding how to use or get an RBC Bank void cheque is an important part of securing your account information with the bank. 

In this guide, I will walk you through how to get and read an RBC void cheque so that your account stays safe.

So continue reading to find out!


What is a Void Cheque?

A void cheque is simply a cheque that has the word “VOID” written boldly across it. This is usually done for security purposes, as it prevents someone from filling and using it. 

It can be useful if you need to provide your banking information to someone but don’t want to go through the process of writing it out yourself.

A void cheque can also be used to set up a direct deposit. To do this, you will need to provide your employer or a bank with a voided cheque. 

This will allow them to see your account information and routing number so that they can deposit your paycheck directly into your account.

You can also use a void cheque to set up automatic bill payments. This can be useful if you want to ensure that your bills are always paid on time, without having to remember to write and mail a cheque each month. 

To do this, you’ll simply provide the Biller (company or person you want to pay) with a void cheque and some other basic information about your bank account. The payment will then be pulled from your bank account automatically going forward.

While void cheques can be helpful in preventing fraud, it’s important to note that they can also be used to commit fraud if they fall into the wrong hands. 

For this reason, it’s important to keep your void cheques in a safe place and to shred them when you no longer need them.


How to Get RBC Void Cheque 

To get a void cheque, simply write “VOID” across any blank cheque from your chequebook. 

But if you don’t have a blank cheque handy, you can usually request one using the RBC online banking portal.

The process is very straightforward. To get an RBC cheque, follow the steps below:

  • First, log in to the RBC online banking portal
  • After you successfully log in, select “Account Services”. It is located on the right side of the portal
  • Next, navigate to the left side of the page and click on “View and Print Void Cheque
Get the RBC void cheque by clicking on the link on the left side
  • After that, you will be required to select an account
  • Read and agree to the terms and conditions
Select the account and accept the terms to print your RBC void cheque
  • Finally, go ahead and click on View and Print.

Upon printing the cheque, you will find three pre-printed sets of numbers. The first 5-digit number is the transit number, the second one is 3 digits and it represents the institution number. And the last number on the cheque is your RBC account number.


How to Read an RBC Void Cheque 

Reading an RBC void cheque is very easy. When you get your RBC void cheque, all you have to do is read the following information:

sample RBC void cheque

Name

The first thing you have to read from your RBC void cheque is the drawer’s name. That is your name and you will find it at the top right corner of your cheque. You will also find your residential address below your name.

Beneficiary 

The next section you have to look at is the beneficiaries section. This is the place where you will see the name of the person or company receiving the payment. Because it is a void cheque, you won’t see anything in this section.

Bank Name and Branch Details

In this section, you will see the details of your bank. This includes the bank’s name (RBC) and the address of the RBC branch you opened your account.

Transit Number

A transit number is a 5-digit number and it represents the RBC branch you bank with. 

Financial Institution Number

The financial institution number represents the bank code. This number is usually in 3 digits and the bank code for RBC is 003. No matter the RBC branch you opened your account with, the bank code will be the same.

Account Number

The last thing you will see on your RBC cheque is your account number. These numbers usually range from 7 to 12 digits.


How to Write an RBC Cheque

Similar to reading an RBC void cheque, writing a cheque is very simple. To write an RBC cheque, follow the steps below:

  • When you get your RBC cheque, the first thing you have to do is write the date. You will find the date section at the top right corner of your cheque
  • The next thing you have to write is the name of the beneficiary (the name of the person you are paying to). This is where you will see “Pay to the order of”.
  • Next, write the amount you want to pay below the beneficiaries name. You will have to write the amount both in figures and in words.
  • Complete the “Memo” section. This is where you will indicate the reason you are making the payment.
  • Lastly, sign the cheque. Signing the cheque is the only way to make it valid.

Conclusion on RBC Void Cheque

As long as you have an RBC Bank account, getting a void cheque with the bank is very easy. 

If you are looking to get an RBC void cheque, you can either visit an RBC branch, or you can simply print one online.

Also, reading an RBC void cheque is very easy, all you have to do is follow the steps provided in this article and you can easily read your RBC void cheque.

Thank you for taking the time to read this article. I hope you will be able to use the information here to help you get an RBC void cheque if you need one.

If you like this article, please share it with your friends. And if you have any questions or concerns, feel free to leave them in the comments section below.

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Simon is a CPA by day and a Personal Finance Blogger by night. With over a decade experience in financial services, he's passionate about personal finance, investing and helping people take control of their financial life.

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